Brave enough to be honest

Confronting the brutal facts are not something a lot of us do. Yet it is one of the elements of becoming everything you dream of.

In business or in life, it is comfortable to allow things to be as they are. The alternative is that we need to take responsibility to change and change (even though we yearn for it) brings with it the price tag of discomfort.

Beyond the discomfort is the prize.

The prize in life, clearly defined, is lacking, me thinks.

Wild Horses Running

That is why most people stay where they are. Vague dreams of living a good life, wishing thing could be better, are bountiful. Therefore stuckness in the norm.

To be unstuck. Liberated. You and I need to be honest.

Honest first with ourselves. Then learn how to authentic with others.

I recently watched Mark Leruste be honest about the entrepreneurial experience. I love the way how he distinguishes between the marketed reality of social media and the experienced reality of everybody. I acknowledge him for voicing what so many business owners experience. I invite you to have a look at his TEDx talk.

My last thoughts.

Face the truth. No matter how uncomfortable. But do not be overwhelmed by it. Face it with love. Love is a verb. Love is that what you do or not do, that leaves the beloved better off. Truth without love is brutal, love without truth is sentimental. Truth saturated with love is powerful.

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The Brutal Liberation of Honesty

In “Good to Great” Jim Collins makes the argument that one of the key elements for sustainable success is the ability to honestly look the facts in the face and deal with them.

Dealing with the honest truth, he says, is possible because of an important underlying belief that we are resilient enough. Resilient enough to recover and overcome from anything life presents to us.

Very few of us are comfortable enough to do this. It is easier to be in denial, to be selective in our awareness. Easier to shift the blame and stubbornly believe that an external power is the source of our situation.

It is hard to be honest to yourself about yourself and it is uncomfortable to be vulnerable in your own presence.

The times I could muster enough courage to shyly look myself in the eye it felt like I was cutting a piece of myself off myself.  The act of honestly accepting the responsibility for myself and my actions (or lack of them) in certain situations in my life made me free and strong. But it sure as hell went down with a lot of gag reflexes.

Now I seem to be standing in front of another mirror. Remembering the uncertainty and dent in my self confidence as well as the powerful liberation and release of inner strength, I tentatively shuffle nearer …

With honesty

H