A Culture of Fairness in Your Business

Sometimes I wonder how much punishment a business can take. When things do not go as planned and there are severe delays in the system, we all tend to wonder. Then I am not surprised when the people in the business step up to change the situation. It confirms an old and deep-seated believe system I have: “Together, we are so much stronger than we think we are.”

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Yet, the belief in our own ability is but one of the building blocks in creating the good life we desire. It also asks that we deliberately create an environment in which we and others can flourish. In business, this flourishing environment is the underlying culture that exists.

There is always a culture present where people come together regularly. Busines owners need to know this. Culture, if not engineered intentionally, will naturally evolve. The latter, unfortunately, allows for the danger of a toxic culture to be present.

One of the essential elements to be built into any culture is fairness.

The lack of fairness is one of the contributing factors of burnout and disengagement. And as Marco Alvera highlights in his TED talk below, it is an expensive ($550 billion per year every year) oversite to not build this in your business culture.

I was impressed by how he argues that improved performance happens in an environment that is experienced as safe enough to make mistakes. This makes so much sense. If you know someone’s got your back, you are more willing to risk and grow.

He also underlines the importance of cultivating the humaneness of the business. The emotional context is as, if not more important than the systems and processes, rules and regulations. Like Maya Angelou said, “People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.

This emotional context need not be one were drama, and soppiness is tolerated. When we expect a lot of people, they usually step up to our expectation. Try to create a vacuum of excellence above a person, and they will spontaneously be sucked into it.

If you would like to create a culture in which fairness is present and do not know precisely how to start, you are welcome to contact me.

Herman

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SCARF: A shelter for the brain

Successful engagements with your clients or employees is closely linked to knowing how to satisfy their social needs.  Social needs are perceived by the brain as important as basic needs like food or shelter.  When these social needs are not met, we feel threatened.  On the other hand we experience a sense of reward when our social needs are met.  A reward emotion will draw a person in and ensure engagement, where a feeling of being threatened causes one to avoid a situation or person.

When your employee experiences a reward emotion, they will be more creative and show increased problem-solving skills.  It also stimulates deep thinking and positive emotions. This employee will be more willing to stretch herself beyond what she would normally be willing to take on.  Unfortunately, a sense of being threatened seems to be the default response in teams.  In a team setting it is therefore even more important to ensure reward emotions.

The SCARF model is used in Life, Business and Team Coaching to diminish a threat response and optimize positive reward emotions.  This acronym stands for Status, Certainty, Autonomy, Relatedness and Fairness.

Status relates to our relative importance, where we feel extremely threatened when we feel less important than someone else or being left out. We even feel better when we feel that we are becoming better than we were previously.  Learning and developing satisfy this need.

Our brain has a constant need to predict the immediate future.  Uncertainty decreases one’s ability to focus.  Giving your client enough information creates certainty and therefore willingness to engage with you. Make sure your clients and employees has the answer to the question “What is going to happen next?”

Autonomy is about having choices and a sense of control. We often hear about people leaving the corporate environment in search of a life where they have increased control over their life.  Creating an environment where employees feel that they have choices will contribute to an engaged workforce.

Are you my friend or my enemy?  This is the need for relatedness; knowing whether another person is “someone like me”.  Research has shown that people place the most trust in information they get from someone they feel connected to.  This increases trust.  Information received from such a person is processed by the brain using the same circuits as the ones processing one’s own thoughts.  Therefore you want to foster a sense of connectedness among colleagues.  You also want your client to feel that you share similarities.  Allowing people to share information about themselves contributes to a feeling of connectedness, especially if similarities are found. Mentoring, buddy systems and working in small groups also contributes to relatedness.

The perception of fairness or lack thereof elicits very strong emotions and reactions.  Consistency helps to increase a sense of fairness.  Perceived unfairness can be due to a lack of knowledge and transparency can help to correct these perceptions.  Establishing clear expectations from your clients and employees and making sure these are met will also contribute to engagement and positive emotions.

Satisfying the social needs of your employees and clients has a significant impact on them. When you find ways to increase their sense of importance, certainty, having choices, feeling connected and being treated fairly; the effect will be extremely satisfying both ways.